Food Allergy Counseling

Food Allergy Counseling
Sloane Miller, Food Allergy Counselor (Picture © Noel Malcolm 2013)

Wednesday, October 23, 2013

Food Allergy Counseling: Food Allergy Friendly Halloween Tips, Jo Frost

A few weeks back I was invited to a webinar hosted by
Mylan Specialty, LLC, marketers of EpiPen that featured the Supernanny Jo Frost. Jo has had food allergies (shellfish) since she was little and it was fun to listen to her talk about how the crew on her show and the families she works with are allergen-free for the week she works with them on her show Family S.O.S. with Jo Frost.

She also gave a some solid tips to follow for Halloween, have a look at the picture.

As always: 


•    Discuss the your food allergy needs with your board certified medical provider.
•    Go over your anaphylaxis action plan
•    Have your two EpiPen epinephrine auotinjectors and emergency medications on you at all times
•    Don't hesitate to use them


Keep in mind this Allergic Girl's must-haves when managing  severe, life-threatening food allergies:



•    A thorough understanding of your food allergy diagnosis
•    An ability to clearly communicate that diagnosis to those around you
•    Support from friends and family around your diagnosis
•    Your emergency medication on hand, as well as your anaphylaxis action plan, just in case
 

Always consult your personal board certified medical provider about what is safe for you and your food allergic needs.
 

*SPECIAL OFFER: Through the end of 2013, there a 0$ co-pay program through EpiPen: https://activatemysavings.com/epipen/.*

Friday, October 18, 2013

Lucini Italia: #ElevateYourCooking Giveaway & Recipe

Lentil Caprese Soup with Lucini Italia Products

I was honored to be invited to create a recipe that was top 8 allergen free for Lucini Italia to help promote their Elevate Your Cooking Giveaway.

Here is a link to the recipe I created. Above, it is pictured with mozzarella – if you are dairy-free, you can substitute any dairy-free cheese of your choice. Here is a link to my interview on Lucini's site. 


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Here's what you can win: Lucini Italia for a year and other great prizes.

Giveaway rules from Lucini Italia: NO PURCHASE OR PAYMENT OF ANY KIND IS NECESSARY TO ENTER OR WIN GIVEAWAY/SWEEPSTAKES. A PURCHASE WILL NOT IMPROVE CHANCES OF WINNING. PROMOTION BEGINS ON SEPTEMBER 1, 2013 AND ENDS ON DECEMBER 31, 2013. Go to the Lucini Italia site for more information.

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Thank you Lucini Italia for creating delicious products and for inviting me to represent those of us with dietary needs!

(NB: I am not involved in any aspect of Lucini Italia’s giveaway other than creating a recipe.)

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Food Allergy Counseling: FPIES Education Conference, IAFFPE

In my food allergy counseling practice, I see a range of clients with a range of dietary restrictions. In the past few years, I’ve seen more and more clients with EoE, EGID and FPIES.  Although FPIES is not an IgE mediated food allergic disease, it is part of the spectrum of illnesses within our food allergic community.

According to Kids with Food Allergies: FPIES is a non-IgE mediated immune reaction in the gastrointestinal system to one or more specific foods, commonly characterized by profuse vomiting and diarrhea. FPIES is presumed to be cell mediated. Poor growth may occur with continual ingestion. Upon removing the problem food(s), all FPIES symptoms subside. (Note: Having FPIES does not preclude one from having other allergies/intolerances with the food.) The most common FPIES triggers are cow's milk (dairy) and soy. However, any food can cause an FPIES reaction, even those not commonly considered allergens, such as rice, oat and barley."

This weekend, October 20, 2013, is the First Annual FPIES Education Conference hosted by The International Association for Food Protein Enterocolitis (IAFFPE)

More information about this conference is here on their site: http://iaffpe.org/.


Monday, October 14, 2013

Mixed Berry Muffins with Streusel Topping. Gluten-Free, Nut-Free: Recipe

Some with streusel, some with just brown sugar on top - both yum

The new King Arthur Gluten-Free Baking Mix is a whopping 24 ounces per box, which means you make several of their recipes. I already made the Coffeecake Streusel muffins, you can read my review and recipe tips here.  But I had some organic frozen mixed berries languishing in my freezer for far too long so I thought I’d use the leftover baking mix, add berries and make some streusel topping (also from the mix) and see what happened. 

Some serious gluten-free, tree-nut free goodness happened!
 


The perfect bite

Here are the mash-up King Arthur Gluten-Free Baking Mix recipes with my substitutions. 


Two notes:
 

1. Filling the muffin tins with a scant quarter (1/4) cup of batter plus streusel I was able to stretch this recipe from eight muffins to 12.
 

2. I also used grams and a kitchen scale which makes baking a real snap. King Arthur Flour has recipe conversions (to ounces or cups and teaspoons) on their site.
 

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Mixed Berry Muffins with Streusel Topping - Gluten-Free, Nut-Free
Yield: 12 muffins

Streusel
82g King Arthur All-Purpose Gluten-Free Baking Mix (gluten-free, tree nut-free)
106g sugar in the raw
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
85g Spectrum organic palm shortening (dairy-free)

Muffins
177g King Arthur All-Purpose Gluten-Free Baking Mix
99g sugar in the raw
50g Lucini Olive Oil
2 large Organic Valley eggs
113g milk (Lactaid lactose-free milk)
1/2 teaspoon gluten-free Neilsen-Massey vanilla extract
128g fresh or frozen blueberries Organic Cascadian Farms

Directions
1) Preheat the oven to 350°F. Line 12 wells of a standard muffin pan.
2) Stir together the dry ingredients in a medium-sized bowl; set aside.
3) Whisk together the oil, eggs, milk, and vanilla.
4) Stir the dry mixture into the wet ingredients. Scrape the bottom and sides of the bowl, and continue to mix just until blended - a few lumps will remain.
5) Fold in the berries.
6) Fill the muffin cups with a scant quarter (1/4) cup.
7) Let the muffins rest for 10 minutes.
8) Mix the streusel topping while the muffins are resting and add to the muffins.






Muffins are a go!

9)Then bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until a cake tester inserted into the center of a muffin comes out clean.
8) Remove the muffins from the oven, and after 5 minutes transfer them to a rack to cool.
Yield: 12 muffins.


Finished muffin - a cross slice of heaven!

Tuesday, October 08, 2013

FARE Webinar, Anaphylaxis & Dr Robert Wood, October 9, 2013

I have no connection with this Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE) event but saw it via my colleagues Mount Sinai Jaffe Food Allergy Institute on Facebook. It’s an excellent opportunity to hear medical advice from on of the top allergist in the country who is well versed in food allergy. More details are below and at this link.

Food Allergy Research & Education Webinar: “All About Anaphylaxis: Understanding the Risks, Symptoms & Treatment with Dr. Robert A. Wood, professor of pediatrics and chief of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology at Johns Hopkins. The webinar will be held Wednesday, Oct. 9, 1 p.m. ET. Register now.
From
Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE) some information about Dr Robert Wood:

Dr. Robert A. Wood, a professor of pediatrics and chief of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology at Johns Hopkins, and professor of International Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, will be the guest speaker at our October webinar focusing on anaphylaxis, a severe allergic reaction that is potentially fatal.

Wood is an internationally recognized expert in food allergy and childhood asthma and has published more than 100 manuscripts in scientific journals, including The New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA, Pediatrics, and the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, as well as two books and numerous book chapters.

He is deputy editor of the journal Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, and was previously an associate editor of the Annals of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology. Wood has served on the editorial board of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, and is on FARE's Medical Advisory Board and on the board of directors of the American Board of Allergy and Immunology.

Monday, October 07, 2013

Food Allergy Counseling: Egg Allergy & Flu Shots, 2013

Influenza is a respiratory illness. As an asthma girl, that puts me in a high-risk category, so, I get my flu shot every year. However, for those of you with an egg allergy or caring for a loved on with an egg allergy, the whole flu shot question has been a winding road. Don’t get it, get it, get it in stages – every year there seems to be a new path to take and every allergist, pediatrician and pulmonologist has a different opinion. This year, the below recommendation is from the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) who says: take it.


*Have a conversation with you board certified medical health provider about what is best for your needs and what the real risk to you is.* 

The below is a press release from American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI):

Egg Allergic Children Now Have no Barriers to Flu Shot
Newest research shows no increased danger 

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, ILL. (Oct. 1, 2013) – All children should have flu shots, http://www.acaai.org/allergist/allergies/Types/drug-allergy/Pages/flu-shots-egg-allergy.aspx even if they have an egg allergy, and it’s now safe to get them without special precautions. This finding is from the latest update on the safety of the flu vaccine for allergic patients, published in the October issue of the Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, the official journal of the 
American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI).

The current recommendation from the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices is to observe children allergic to eggs for 30 minutes after a flu shot. Also to have the shot under the care of a primary care provider, if the reaction to eating eggs is only hives, or an allergist, if the reaction to eating eggs is more serious.

However, “In a large number of research studies published over the last several years, thousands of egg allergic children, including those with a severe life-threatening reaction to eating eggs, have received injectable influenza vaccine (IIV) as a single dose without a reaction” said allergist John Kelso, MD, fellow of the ACAAI.

This update, endorsed by the AAAAI/
ACAAI Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters, concludes that based upon the available data, "Special precautions regarding medical setting and waiting periods after administration of IIV to egg-allergic recipients beyond those recommended for any vaccine are not warranted. For IIV, language that describes egg-allergic recipients as being at increased risk compared with non-egg-allergic recipients or requiring special precautions should be removed from guidelines and product labeling.

The benefits of the flu vaccination far outweigh any risk,” said Dr. Kelso. “As with any vaccine, all personnel and facilities administering flu shots should have procedures in place for the rare instance of anaphylaxis, a severe life-threatening allergic reaction. If you have questions or concerns, contact your allergist.”

Egg allergy is one of the most common food allergies in children. By age 16, about 70 percent of children outgrow their egg allergy. Most allergic reactions to egg involve the skin. In fact, egg allergy is the most common food allergy in babies and young children with eczema.

Further, the flu is responsible for the hospitalization of more than 21,100 children under the age of five annually, yet only two thirds of children receive the vaccination each year. Some go unvaccinated because of egg allergy.
 
ACAAI also advises the more than 25.7 million Americans with asthma to receive the flu vaccination. Because the flu and asthma are both respiratory conditions, asthmatics may experience more frequent and severe asthma attacks while they have the flu.

Everyone with allergies and asthma should be able to feel good, be active all day and sleep well at night. No one should accept less. For more information about allergy and asthma, and to locate an allergist in your area, visit AllergyAndAsthmaRelief.org

About 
ACAAI The ACAAI is a professional medical organization of more than 5,700 allergists-immunologists and allied health professionals, headquartered in Arlington Heights, Ill. The College fosters a culture of collaboration and congeniality in which its members work together and with others toward the common goals of patient care, education, advocacy and research. ACAAI allergists are board-certified physicians trained to diagnose allergies and asthma, administer immunotherapy, and provide patients with the best treatment outcomes. For more information and to find relief, visit AllergyAndAsthmaRelief.org