Food Allergy Counseling

Food Allergy Counseling
Sloane Miller, Food Allergy Counselor (Picture © Noel Malcolm 2013)

Monday, November 11, 2013

Food Allergy Counseling: How Common Is Anaphylaxis: Study

Some of the most well-respected leaders in the food allergy medical field, including Robert A. Wood, MD; Philip Lieberman, MD; Hugh A. Sampson, MD; and F. Estelle R. Simons, MD
were involved in a new study about anaphylaxis.

The conclusion: "According to the peer-reviewed study, anaphylaxis very likely occurs in nearly 1-in-50 Americans (1.6%), and the rate is probably higher, close to 1-in-20 (5.1%)."

Here's a full text of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (JACI) study

Below is a partial of the press release from Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA).

***

NEW STUDY SHOWS NEARLY 1-IN-50 AMERICANS AT-RISK FOR SEVERE ALLERGIC REACTIONS

Anaphylaxis is More Common Than Many Thought, Most Patients are Not Prepared

A novel study by the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA) published today in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (JACI), finds that severe life-threatening allergic reactions – anaphylaxis – are common in the U.S.  According to the peer-reviewed study, anaphylaxis very likely occurs in nearly 1-in-50 Americans (1.6%), and the rate is probably higher, close to 1-in-20 (5.1%).

The article, Anaphylaxis in America: The Prevalence and Characteristics of Anaphylaxis in the United States, based on AAFA’s study of the same name, provides one of the most reliable estimates to-date of the prevalence of severe, life-threatening allergies in the general population.  It is also helping experts understand how the public, patients and caregivers think, feel and behave regarding anaphylaxis.  For the full text of the article, visit www.aafa.org/AnaphylaxisInAmerica.

Dr. Robert Wood is the lead author of the article, chair of the AAFA research panel that conducted the study, and Director of Allergy & Immunology at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center.  “This study provides the first estimate of anaphylaxis prevalence in the United States using a large unbiased survey,” according to the article.  But the authors also pointed out that patients do not appear adequately equipped to deal with future episodes, indicating the need for public health initiatives to improve anaphylaxis recognition and treatment.

“One of the most alarming things we found is that, despite the common occurrence of anaphylaxis, most people are not prepared to do the right thing when emergency reactions occur,” says Mike Tringale, Senior Vice President at AAFA and one of the authors of the article.  “We need to re-double our efforts to make sure that people are informed and have access to the right medication.”


For the full text of the article, visit www.aafa.org/AnaphylaxisInAmerica.





1 comment:

The Running Chef said...

Interesting to read, and pretty shocking. Something that should be brought out into public awareness. Pretty scary, and shows that we need to learn more about how to be prepared if someone does have an attack.

Thank you for sharing
Tina
http://fuelyourfuturewithtina.blogspot.com/