Food Allergy Counseling

Food Allergy Counseling
Sloane Miller, Food Allergy Counselor (Picture © Noel Malcolm 2013)

Tuesday, September 09, 2008

Can You Trust Again? Post-Allergy Trauma

A great story about a little discussed effect of severe food allergy responses: ongoing anxiety.

Below is an excerpt, the rest is here on ABCNEWS.com.

ABC News, Can You Trust Again? Post-Allergy Trauma: Going Back to Normal After an Allergic Attack By Radha Chitale, ABC News Medical Unit

"Concrete actions after an episode, such as identifying the trigger and avoiding it, speaking with a child's teachers or other caretakers about what to do in an emergency, refreshing medical supplies or getting a medical identification bracelet, can help the family move beyond the fear of another attack. Robinson said most families recover in about six to eight weeks.

But, while these actions can go a long way toward relieving some anxiety, "the psychological underpinnings of that are difficult to overcome," said Sloane Miller, a food allergy coach and advocate who's president of Allergic Girl Resources Inc. in New York. "So many social events are around food. ... Life can become very restrictive if you can't rebuild that trust."

Copyright © 2008 ABC News Internet Ventures

5 comments:

Tara said...

What a great article, Sloane. As a mommy, I completely understand these issues. I felt terrible that my little girl's reaction to peanut butter was the result of me forcing her to try it (for good reason, of course-- her intended preschool was not nut-free, but still...)

Even now, my not even 3 year old asks "Is that safe, Mommy?" and "Did you read the label, Mommy?". A good habit, but it makes me sad in so many ways as well...

Allergic Girl said...

thanks tara!

Jennifer B said...

Thank you for sharing this article. The potential for an anaphylactic reaction is so disturbing. My peanut allergic child is now in preschool, and I provide his snack, but I worry every day that there could be a labeling error or other problem causing a reaction and I am not even there to help. And when that revealing first reaction occurred, the realization that he could have died was almost too much to bear. It definitely takes time for the allergic individual, the family, and others present to recover. I think it is very helpful to read articles such as the one you share today.

Sonya said...

Sloane,
My mom just sent me an article about you from CNN and I must say...I felt relieved. My just 2 year old had an allergic reaction to cashews and stopped breathing, and even now at 2.5 I still fret about every little thing that he eats because I never want to have him go through that again. Almost losing your child to something so small is ingrained in your mind forever!

Eating out at restaurants has been difficult for us, although more healthy to eat at home, less fun sometimes! :) I look forward to reading more of your blog and learning more about how to live easier!

Take Care,
Sonya

A+ said...

I, myself, am struggling with this right now. I am having a really, really hard time trusting ANY food after reacting to something but haven't been able to figure out what. I'm starting to feel paranoid and anorexic.