Food Allergy Counseling

Food Allergy Counseling
Sloane Miller, Food Allergy Counselor (Picture © Noel Malcolm 2013)

Monday, October 07, 2013

Food Allergy Counseling: Egg Allergy & Flu Shots, 2013

Influenza is a respiratory illness. As an asthma girl, that puts me in a high-risk category, so, I get my flu shot every year. However, for those of you with an egg allergy or caring for a loved on with an egg allergy, the whole flu shot question has been a winding road. Don’t get it, get it, get it in stages – every year there seems to be a new path to take and every allergist, pediatrician and pulmonologist has a different opinion. This year, the below recommendation is from the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) who says: take it.


*Have a conversation with you board certified medical health provider about what is best for your needs and what the real risk to you is.* 

The below is a press release from American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI):

Egg Allergic Children Now Have no Barriers to Flu Shot
Newest research shows no increased danger 

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, ILL. (Oct. 1, 2013) – All children should have flu shots, http://www.acaai.org/allergist/allergies/Types/drug-allergy/Pages/flu-shots-egg-allergy.aspx even if they have an egg allergy, and it’s now safe to get them without special precautions. This finding is from the latest update on the safety of the flu vaccine for allergic patients, published in the October issue of the Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, the official journal of the 
American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI).

The current recommendation from the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices is to observe children allergic to eggs for 30 minutes after a flu shot. Also to have the shot under the care of a primary care provider, if the reaction to eating eggs is only hives, or an allergist, if the reaction to eating eggs is more serious.

However, “In a large number of research studies published over the last several years, thousands of egg allergic children, including those with a severe life-threatening reaction to eating eggs, have received injectable influenza vaccine (IIV) as a single dose without a reaction” said allergist John Kelso, MD, fellow of the ACAAI.

This update, endorsed by the AAAAI/
ACAAI Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters, concludes that based upon the available data, "Special precautions regarding medical setting and waiting periods after administration of IIV to egg-allergic recipients beyond those recommended for any vaccine are not warranted. For IIV, language that describes egg-allergic recipients as being at increased risk compared with non-egg-allergic recipients or requiring special precautions should be removed from guidelines and product labeling.

The benefits of the flu vaccination far outweigh any risk,” said Dr. Kelso. “As with any vaccine, all personnel and facilities administering flu shots should have procedures in place for the rare instance of anaphylaxis, a severe life-threatening allergic reaction. If you have questions or concerns, contact your allergist.”

Egg allergy is one of the most common food allergies in children. By age 16, about 70 percent of children outgrow their egg allergy. Most allergic reactions to egg involve the skin. In fact, egg allergy is the most common food allergy in babies and young children with eczema.

Further, the flu is responsible for the hospitalization of more than 21,100 children under the age of five annually, yet only two thirds of children receive the vaccination each year. Some go unvaccinated because of egg allergy.
 
ACAAI also advises the more than 25.7 million Americans with asthma to receive the flu vaccination. Because the flu and asthma are both respiratory conditions, asthmatics may experience more frequent and severe asthma attacks while they have the flu.

Everyone with allergies and asthma should be able to feel good, be active all day and sleep well at night. No one should accept less. For more information about allergy and asthma, and to locate an allergist in your area, visit AllergyAndAsthmaRelief.org

About 
ACAAI The ACAAI is a professional medical organization of more than 5,700 allergists-immunologists and allied health professionals, headquartered in Arlington Heights, Ill. The College fosters a culture of collaboration and congeniality in which its members work together and with others toward the common goals of patient care, education, advocacy and research. ACAAI allergists are board-certified physicians trained to diagnose allergies and asthma, administer immunotherapy, and provide patients with the best treatment outcomes. For more information and to find relief, visit AllergyAndAsthmaRelief.org

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